Google blocking privacy technology

Google is fighting bots by compromising its users’ privacy – the countermeasure is a form of punishing the innocent to get at the guilty.

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Google Query Reveals Federal Health Surveillance

An off-the-cuff search on Google revealed all kinds of interesting goodies, including a case study showing how routine public health surveillance to determine if a disease outbreak may be taking place.

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The Net Giants’ Privacy Timebomb

Search data stored by the likes of Google & AOL is a privacy timebomb. It’s time for these Net giants to hit the delete key. Most companies don’t routinely and purposefully delete their data. It costs more to purge than to store, so businesses take the path of least resistance. Historically, this has caused orphaned account information to linger.

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Hail the Konqueror

Many KDE users tend to take the Konqueror Web browser for granted, but that’s a mistake. Konqueror may not be able to replace Firefox as a Web browser for every site, but it does a lot more than just simple browsing.

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The Internet Via the Command Line

UNIX provides hundreds, if not thousands, of commands with which you can manipulate a large variety of resources available in the kernel and user space. Martin Streicher, Editor-in-Chief, Linux Magazine, looks at three essential UNIX utilities that deliver the entire Internet to your command line.

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What Do They Know About You?

America’s top four Internet companies — Google, Yahoo, AOL and Microsoft — promise they will protect the personal information of people who use their online services to search, shop and socialize. But a close read of their privacy policies reveals as much exposure as protection.

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Look At All These Passwords!

If you use any number of popular web forums or even some commercial services like classmates.com, amazon.com, netzero.com or your provider’s webmail service, you may not be aware that you’re sending your credentials over the internet in the clear. Some sites appear to secure your credentials, but they really don’t.

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